Movement Makers at NSAC 2014

Movement Makers at NSAC 2014

Several Movement Makers went to the 2014 National Sexual Assault Conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania this week. Here’s a glimpse of what happened!

Thursday, August 21 – Move to End Violence Workshop – Over 50 participants at the Move to End Violence workshop at the National Sexual Assault Conference illustrated their vision of a movement to end violence –  people working together, trust, empathy, compassion, and more. Movement Makers Scheherazade Tillet, Eesha Pandit, and Kelly Miller shared the reasons why they applied to the NoVo Foundation Move to End Violence initiative, the theory of change, the work of cohort one as well as the work of cohort two focusing on race, class, power and privilege. The Movement Makers shared how Move to End Violence has influenced their own work and reflected on the possibilities of the power of our growing movement and network, demonstrated by the current advocacy around My Brother’s Keeper to expand to include women and girls, a national response to Marissa Alexander’s case in Florida, and more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Movement Makers Kelly Miller, Scheherazade Tillet, Eesha Pandit with workshop participants Maria Hernandez and Ethelvina Sanchez 

Wednesday, August 20thTribal and State Coalition MEV meeting – Tribal and state coalition directors and senior leadership were invited to Move to End Violence luncheon to engage in a conversation about the impact on Move to End Violence on the Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition and the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence. Leaders from thirty-eight tribal, state and territory coalitions heard from from Guadalupe Lopez with the Minnesota tribal coalition and Kelly Miller from the Idaho Coalition, who both shared the positive impact on their organizations – from self-care and sustainability to integrating movement building and the possibilities of a network. Everyone expressed the need to create time and space for tribal and state sexual assault, domestic violence, and dual coalitions to come together to do movement building work together. 

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